Adult Education

Our adult education programs and activities reflect a deep commitment to thoughtful implementation of Jewish tradition. We support each other on our personal journeys through communal programs of learning for all ages. Our programs strive to engage not only the mind, but also the heart. We are a community of life longer learners.

2022 Holocaust Education Month

All events are virtual, and registration is required, see links below.

November 10th, Holocaust Education Month 2022 Launch Event with Dr. Wendy Lower, 7:00 pm

The Ravine: A Family, A Photograph, A Holocaust Massacre Revealed
Registration Link: https://sidepony.ca/ches-november-10

The virtual Launch Event for Holocaust Education Month 2022 in commemoration of Kristallnacht will feature award-winning Holocaust historian Dr. Wendy Lower. She will discuss the research that led to her latest book, The Ravine: A Family, A Photograph, A Holocaust Massacre Revealed. By investigating a single photograph taken in Miropol, Ukraine, in 1941, Dr. Lower unveils the networks of complicity that made the Holocaust possible. An overview of Ukraine and the Shoah will be delivered by Professor Jan Graboski, history professor at the University of Ottawa.

November 13th, A Virtual Descendants Event with Dr. Debórah Dwork and Rachel Cerrotti, 2:00 pm

Inspired by Correspondence – Letters that Survived
Registration Link: https://sidepony.ca/ches-november-13

Renowned Holocaust historian and author Dr. Debórah Dwork and Rachael Cerrotti, an author, educator, documentary producer, and storyteller, will examine how Jewish families in Nazi-occupied Europe tried to hold onto each other through letters written under wartime conditions.

November 17th, Free Virtual Teachers’ Workshop, 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Creating Safe Spaces: Navigating the Language of Anti-Semitism and Hate
Registration Link: https://sidepony.ca/ches-november-17

CHES will host its annual Teachers’ Workshop for educators in all Ottawa school boards and throughout Ontario free of charge. Back by popular demand, Avi Posen of Unpacked for Educators will host and facilitate the workshop which will examine the facts and language of antisemitism and suggest ways for teachers to recognize discrimination. It will touch on strategies to diffuse situations of escalation and provide tools for engaging in difficult conversations in the classroom and with colleagues. Creating safe spaces is CHES’ goal for all students. For the outline of the workshop click on link above.

For additional information: info@chesatottawa.ca  or chesatottawa.ca

Irme Rosenberg Lecture: Our Fragile Democracy with Andrew Cohen

If you missed the Imre Rosenberg memorial lecture with Andrew Cohen on November 3, you can watch it here: https://fb.watch/gF06gfwD82/

The big, continuing story in America is the erosion of civility and rise of vulgarity in public discourse; the assault on voting rights; the decline of moral authority of Congress and the Supreme Court. Abroad, the forces of autocracy are winning in Russia, of course, which is now moving quickly from authoritarianism to totalitarianism. Anti-democratic forces dominate Hungary, Turkey, Brazil, and threaten in France. In many places, the pro-Putin forces are winning. In Canada, we had our own brush with anti-democratic behaviour this winter, and we must be vigilant.

Andrew Cohen is an author, columnist and broadcaster who joined the Carleton School of Journalism and Communication in 2001. In a career of 40 years, he has worked in Ottawa, Toronto, Washington, London and Berlin. He has written for The Globe and Mail, The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, United Press International, Time, CNN.com, and The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, among other publications.

Andrew Cohen

Insight into Judaism 2022-2023

This IN PERSON course will run on Monday evenings from 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm.
The first class will meet on September 12, 2022.

Insight into JudaismCome and join Rabbi Mikelberg this fall as we delve into Jewish faith, Jewish culture and Jewish life in this year long journey. Torah will be our guide for us as individuals and in community.

We will explore tradition and texts, history of the Jewish People, Jewish holy days, ritual and life-cycle events. No previous experience necessary.

Insight Into Judaism includes a weekly Hebrew language component which will have all participants comfortable with essential Hebrew prayers and blessings.

Insight Into Judaism is ideal for anyone, Jewish or non-Jewish, who is interested in learning more about Jewish life and Jewish heritage. It is also for those seeking conversion under Reform auspices. Students are asked to commit to attend weekly classes from the end of August through May 2022.

The course is $720 for non members and $360 for Temple members. Materials are included.

If you are interested in enrolling in the course or for any other inquiries, please contact rabbimikelberg@templeisraelottawa.com.

 

Wednesday Talmud Class

Talmud class

For over 20 years, a committed core of students augmented by community members has been solving the mysteries of where our practices and values originate. We unpack the hidden histories and words of the ancient rabbis through the pages of the Talmud and modern explanations

Join us on Wednesdays at 1 pm. This adult education class is led by Rabbi Garten.

 

Books and Bagels

No registration or RSVP is necessary.
By zoom https://templeisraelottawa.zoom.us/j/99903947671
* The zoom link won’t work until the review date.

Nov. 27, 2022, Our Country Friends by Gary Shteyngart will be reviewed by Carlie MacPherson. This book explores the dynamics among a group of friends sheltering from the pandemic in an American weekend cottage.

Where can I get the books?

Books are available through the Ottawa Public Library or the Greenberg Families Library at the Soloway JCC. The Malca Pass library and Temple Israel Library may also carry some of these titles.

Missed a Books and Bagels discussion?

We’ve archived past discussions.

See Past Books and Bagels Discussions

Cooking with Temple

Temple’s chef Emma and her aspiring foodie sidekick Susan joined forces to present a virtual cooking and conversation hour on cooking for Sukkot.

Stuffed Eggplant (M’hasha)

Presented by Emma

  • 10 small eggplants, cored, the inside chopped
  • Oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • A bunch of parsley, chopped (stem and leaves separate)
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • ⅓ can of tomatoes
  • 1 ½ lbs ground beef
  • Pepper and salt to taste

Sauce:

  1. Mix ⅔ can of diced tomatoes, ½ can of water, lemon juice (about 3 lemons), about 4tbsp of brown sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil and set aside.
  2. Sauté onions, eggplant core, parsley stems in oil; season with salt and pepper.
  3. Add tomatoes, lemon juice, sugar, and adjust the seasoning (it should taste sweet and sour).
  4. Mix the ground beef with the parsley leaves, and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Add the eggplant/tomato mixture to the ground beef, mix first with a wooden spoon and when the mixture is cooler, mix with your hands until well incorporated.
  6. Stuff the eggplants with the mixture.
  7. Put the eggplants in a pot and pour the sauce around them until sauce reaches the edge of the eggplant. Cook on medium heat for about 20 minutes, then lower the heat and simmer until cooked and the tastes have developed. Adjust the seasoning, and serve with rice.

Eggplant recipe ingredients
Eggplant prep

Pumpkin with Everything Good

(Adapted from Dorie Greenspan)
Presented by Susan

  • 1 pumpkin, about 3 pounds (I like pie pumpkins/sugar pumpkins)
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 pound stale bread,  cut into 1/2-inch chunks (dried stuffing also works)
  • 1/4 pound cheese, such as Gruyère, cut into 1/2-inch chunks (any melting cheese like cheddar – or a mix of cheeses – will work!)
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, minced
  • About 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives (you could also use scallions)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 1/3 cup (or more) heavy cream (you can use a mix of cream and milk if you prefer a lighter dish)
  • Pinch of grated nutmeg

Center a rack in the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment, or find a casserole dish with a diameter that’s just a tiny bit larger than your pumpkin.  (If you bake the pumpkin in a casserole dish, it will keep its shape, but you’ll need to serve it from the casserole.  If you bake it on a baking sheet, you can present it freestanding, but maneuvering a stuffed pumpkin with a baked shell isn’t always easy.  I usually prefer to take the risk, as the presentation is pretty great!)

Using a sharp and sturdy knife, cut a “lid” out of the top of the pumpkin.  You want to cut off enough of a lid to make it easy to get inside the pumpkin.  Clear away the seeds and strings from the cap and from inside the pumpkin (this is a great job for kids). Season the inside of the pumpkin with salt and pepper, and put it on the baking sheet or in the pot.

Toss the bread, cheese, garlic, and herbs together in a bowl.  Season with pepper and stuff the mix into the pumpkin.  The pumpkin should be well filled.  Stir the cream with the nutmeg and some salt and pepper and pour it into the pumpkin.  You want enough cream that the ingredients are moistened but not so much that it looks like soup.  (Both the filling and the cream are a bit to taste and to the eye.  I always think more cheese is better!  You will likely need to adjust, depending on the size of the pumpkin).

Put the top in place and bake the pumpkin for about 2 hours (checking after 90 minutes) or until everything inside the pumpkin is bubbling and the flesh of the pumpkin is tender enough to be pierced with a knife (like testing a cake).  Remove the top during the last 20 minutes of cooking to bake away any liquid and so the stuffing can toast a bit.  When the pumpkin is ready, carefully bring it to the table.

This is also great with cooked rice (especially if you can’t have gluten – it is more of a risotto), peas, kale, or apples and chestnuts.

And, what to do with all of those pumpkin seeds?

  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons salt, plus more for seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons spice blend of your choice

Heat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.  Fill a medium saucepan with two cups of water and season with 2 teaspoons salt.  Bring to a boil.  Meanwhile, clean the pumpkin seeds you have scooped from your pumpkin in a bowl filled with cold water.  Add the cleaned seeds to the boiling water and simmer for five minutes. Drain and pat the seeds very dry.  Place the seeds onto the prepared baking sheet.  Add the oil and any spices then toss until well coated. Spread the seeds into one layer. Bake, stirring  at least once, until golden, between 10-20 minutes, depending on the size of the seeds.

Pumpkin dish ingredients
Pumpkin dish spices
Pumpkin dish pre-cooked
Pumpkin dish cooked

Our adult education programs and activities reflect a deep commitment to thoughtful implementation of Jewish tradition. We support each other on our personal journeys through communal programs of learning for all ages. Our programs strive to engage not only the mind, but also the heart. We are a community of life longer learners.

2022 Holocaust Education Month

Events are virtual, and registration is required, see  below.

November 17th, Free Virtual Teachers’ Workshop, 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Creating Safe Spaces: Navigating the Language of Anti-Semitism and Hate
Registration Link: https://sidepony.ca/ches-november-17

CHES will host its annual Teachers’ Workshop for educators in all Ottawa school boards and throughout Ontario free of charge. Back by popular demand, Avi Posen of Unpacked for Educators will host and facilitate the workshop which will examine the facts and language of antisemitism and suggest ways for teachers to recognize discrimination. It will touch on strategies to diffuse situations of escalation and provide tools for engaging in difficult conversations in the classroom and with colleagues. Creating safe spaces is CHES’ goal for all students. For the outline of the workshop click on link above.

For additional information: info@chesatottawa.ca  or chesatottawa.ca

Irme Rosenberg Lecture: Our Fragile Democracy with Andrew Cohen

Andrew CohenIf you missed the Imre Rosenberg memorial lecture with Andrew Cohen on November 3, you can watch it here: https://fb.watch/gF06gfwD82/

The big, continuing story in America is the erosion of civility and rise of vulgarity in public discourse; the assault on voting rights; the decline of moral authority of Congress and the Supreme Court. Abroad, the forces of autocracy are winning in Russia, of course, which is now moving quickly from authoritarianism to totalitarianism. Anti-democratic forces dominate Hungary, Turkey, Brazil, and threaten in France. In many places, the pro-Putin forces are winning. In Canada, we had our own brush with anti-democratic behaviour this winter, and we must be vigilant.

Andrew Cohen is an author, columnist and broadcaster who joined the Carleton School of Journalism and Communication in 2001. In a career of 40 years, he has worked in Ottawa, Toronto, Washington, London and Berlin. He has written for The Globe and Mail, The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, United Press International, Time, CNN.com, and The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, among other publications.

Insight into Judaism 2022-2023

This IN PERSON course will run on Monday evenings from 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm.
The first class will meet on September 12, 2022.

Insight into JudaismCome and join Rabbi Mikelberg this fall as we delve into Jewish faith, Jewish culture and Jewish life in this year long journey. Torah will be our guide for us as individuals and in community.

We will explore tradition and texts, history of the Jewish People, Jewish holy days, ritual and life-cycle events. No previous experience necessary.

Insight Into Judaism includes a weekly Hebrew language component which will have all participants comfortable with essential Hebrew prayers and blessings.

Insight Into Judaism is ideal for anyone, Jewish or non-Jewish, who is interested in learning more about Jewish life and Jewish heritage. It is also for those seeking conversion under Reform auspices. Students are asked to commit to attend weekly classes from the end of August through May 2022. 

The course is $720 for non members and $360 for Temple members. Materials are included.

If you are interested in enrolling in the course or for any other inquiries, please contact rabbimikelberg@templeisraelottawa.com.

Wednesday Talmud Class

Talmud class

For over 20 years, a committed core of students augmented by community members has been solving the mysteries of where our practices and values originate. We unpack the hidden histories and words of the ancient rabbis through the pages of the Talmud and modern explanations

Join us on Wednesdays at 1 pm. This adult education class is led by Rabbi Garten.

Books and Bagels

Books and Bagels invites you to attend the following reviews. Sessions are held on a Sunday morning on Zoom 10-11:30 a.m.

Everyone is welcome and no registration is required.
By zoom https://templeisraelottawa.zoom.us/j/99903947671
* The zoom link won’t work until the review date.

Nov. 27, 2022: “Our Country Friends” by Gary Shteyngart will be reviewed by Carlie MacPherson. This book explores the dynamics among a group of friends sheltering from the pandemic in an American weekend cottage.

Jan. 15, 2023: “Can We Talk About Israel?: A Guide for the Curious, Confused, and Conflicted” by Daniel Sokatch will be reviewed by Rabbi Steven Garten. Daniel Sokatch is the CEO of the New Israel Fund. This book is “an extremely nuanced view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict……broad in scope, detailed in analysis…thought provoking for the well-informed yet accessible for the new learner.”

Feb. 12, 2023: “Rebel Daughter” by Lori Banov Kaufmann will be reviewed by Jonathan Dunsky, an Israeli author. “Rebel Daughter” is a “tale of family, love and resilience … inspired by a major archaeological discovery in southern Italy: the 2,000 year old gravestone of Claudia Aster (Esther)”.

March 19, 2023: “People Love Dead Jews” by Dara Horn will be reviewed by Professor Deirdre Butler. According to Kirkus Reviews this is “a guided tour of the hypocrisy that serves as the mechanism by which antisemitism rages on unchecked”.

Look for details in weekly email updates, your usual source of Books and Bagels information or contact Lily Cox, lilycox@bell.net.

Where can I get the books?

Books are available through the Ottawa Public Library or the Greenberg Families Library at the Soloway JCC. The Malca Pass library and Temple Israel Library may also carry some of these titles.

Missed a Books and Bagels discussion?

We’ve archived past discussions.

See Past Books and Bagels Discussions

Cooking with Temple

Temple’s chef Emma and her aspiring foodie sidekick Susan joined forces to present a virtual cooking and conversation hour on cooking for Sukkot.

Stuffed Eggplant (M’hasha)

Presented by Emma

  • 10 small eggplants, cored, the inside chopped
  • Oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • A bunch of parsley, chopped (stem and leaves separate)
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • ⅓ can of tomatoes
  • 1 ½ lbs ground beef
  • Pepper and salt to taste

Sauce:

  1. Mix ⅔ can of diced tomatoes, ½ can of water, lemon juice (about 3 lemons), about 4tbsp of brown sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil and set aside.
  2. Sauté onions, eggplant core, parsley stems in oil; season with salt and pepper.
  3. Add tomatoes, lemon juice, sugar, and adjust the seasoning (it should taste sweet and sour).
  4. Mix the ground beef with the parsley leaves, and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Add the eggplant/tomato mixture to the ground beef, mix first with a wooden spoon and when the mixture is cooler, mix with your hands until well incorporated.
  6. Stuff the eggplants with the mixture.
  7. Put the eggplants in a pot and pour the sauce around them until sauce reaches the edge of the eggplant. Cook on medium heat for about 20 minutes, then lower the heat and simmer until cooked and the tastes have developed. Adjust the seasoning, and serve with rice.

Eggplant recipe ingredients
Eggplant prep

Pumpkin with Everything Good

(Adapted from Dorie Greenspan)
Presented by Susan

  • 1 pumpkin, about 3 pounds (I like pie pumpkins/sugar pumpkins)
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 pound stale bread,  cut into 1/2-inch chunks (dried stuffing also works)
  • 1/4 pound cheese, such as Gruyère, cut into 1/2-inch chunks (any melting cheese like cheddar – or a mix of cheeses – will work!)
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, minced
  • About 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives (you could also use scallions)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 1/3 cup (or more) heavy cream (you can use a mix of cream and milk if you prefer a lighter dish)
  • Pinch of grated nutmeg

Center a rack in the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment, or find a casserole dish with a diameter that’s just a tiny bit larger than your pumpkin.  (If you bake the pumpkin in a casserole dish, it will keep its shape, but you’ll need to serve it from the casserole.  If you bake it on a baking sheet, you can present it freestanding, but maneuvering a stuffed pumpkin with a baked shell isn’t always easy.  I usually prefer to take the risk, as the presentation is pretty great!)

Using a sharp and sturdy knife, cut a “lid” out of the top of the pumpkin.  You want to cut off enough of a lid to make it easy to get inside the pumpkin.  Clear away the seeds and strings from the cap and from inside the pumpkin (this is a great job for kids). Season the inside of the pumpkin with salt and pepper, and put it on the baking sheet or in the pot.

Toss the bread, cheese, garlic, and herbs together in a bowl.  Season with pepper and stuff the mix into the pumpkin.  The pumpkin should be well filled.  Stir the cream with the nutmeg and some salt and pepper and pour it into the pumpkin.  You want enough cream that the ingredients are moistened but not so much that it looks like soup.  (Both the filling and the cream are a bit to taste and to the eye.  I always think more cheese is better!  You will likely need to adjust, depending on the size of the pumpkin).

Put the top in place and bake the pumpkin for about 2 hours (checking after 90 minutes) or until everything inside the pumpkin is bubbling and the flesh of the pumpkin is tender enough to be pierced with a knife (like testing a cake).  Remove the top during the last 20 minutes of cooking to bake away any liquid and so the stuffing can toast a bit.  When the pumpkin is ready, carefully bring it to the table.

This is also great with cooked rice (especially if you can’t have gluten – it is more of a risotto), peas, kale, or apples and chestnuts.

And, what to do with all of those pumpkin seeds?

  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons salt, plus more for seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons spice blend of your choice

Heat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.  Fill a medium saucepan with two cups of water and season with 2 teaspoons salt.  Bring to a boil.  Meanwhile, clean the pumpkin seeds you have scooped from your pumpkin in a bowl filled with cold water.  Add the cleaned seeds to the boiling water and simmer for five minutes. Drain and pat the seeds very dry.  Place the seeds onto the prepared baking sheet.  Add the oil and any spices then toss until well coated. Spread the seeds into one layer. Bake, stirring  at least once, until golden, between 10-20 minutes, depending on the size of the seeds.

Pumpkin dish ingredients
Pumpkin dish spices
Pumpkin dish pre-cooked
Pumpkin dish cooked

Our adult education programs and activities reflect a deep commitment to thoughtful implementation of Jewish tradition. We support each other on our personal journeys through communal programs of learning for all ages. Our programs strive to engage not only the mind, but also the heart. We are a community of life longer learners.

2022 Holocaust Education Month

Events are virtual, and registration is required, see  below.

November 17th, Free Virtual Teachers’ Workshop, 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Creating Safe Spaces: Navigating the Language of Anti-Semitism and Hate
Registration Link: https://sidepony.ca/ches-november-17

CHES will host its annual Teachers’ Workshop for educators in all Ottawa school boards and throughout Ontario free of charge. Back by popular demand, Avi Posen of Unpacked for Educators will host and facilitate the workshop which will examine the facts and language of antisemitism and suggest ways for teachers to recognize discrimination. It will touch on strategies to diffuse situations of escalation and provide tools for engaging in difficult conversations in the classroom and with colleagues. Creating safe spaces is CHES’ goal for all students. For the outline of the workshop click on link above.

For additional information: info@chesatottawa.ca  or chesatottawa.ca

Irme Rosenberg Lecture: Our Fragile Democracy with Andrew Cohen

Andrew CohenIf you missed the Imre Rosenberg memorial lecture with Andrew Cohen on November 3, you can watch it here: https://fb.watch/gF06gfwD82/

The big, continuing story in America is the erosion of civility and rise of vulgarity in public discourse; the assault on voting rights; the decline of moral authority of Congress and the Supreme Court. Abroad, the forces of autocracy are winning in Russia, of course, which is now moving quickly from authoritarianism to totalitarianism. Anti-democratic forces dominate Hungary, Turkey, Brazil, and threaten in France. In many places, the pro-Putin forces are winning. In Canada, we had our own brush with anti-democratic behaviour this winter, and we must be vigilant.

Andrew Cohen is an author, columnist and broadcaster who joined the Carleton School of Journalism and Communication in 2001. In a career of 40 years, he has worked in Ottawa, Toronto, Washington, London and Berlin. He has written for The Globe and Mail, The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, United Press International, Time, CNN.com, and The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, among other publications.

Insight into Judaism 2022-2023

This IN PERSON course will run on Monday evenings from 7:00 pm to 9:30 pm.
The first class will meet on September 12, 2022.

Insight into JudaismCome and join Rabbi Mikelberg this fall as we delve into Jewish faith, Jewish culture and Jewish life in this year long journey. Torah will be our guide for us as individuals and in community.

We will explore tradition and texts, history of the Jewish People, Jewish holy days, ritual and life-cycle events. No previous experience necessary.

Insight Into Judaism includes a weekly Hebrew language component which will have all participants comfortable with essential Hebrew prayers and blessings.

Insight Into Judaism is ideal for anyone, Jewish or non-Jewish, who is interested in learning more about Jewish life and Jewish heritage. It is also for those seeking conversion under Reform auspices. Students are asked to commit to attend weekly classes from the end of August through May 2022. 

The course is $720 for non members and $360 for Temple members. Materials are included.

If you are interested in enrolling in the course or for any other inquiries, please contact rabbimikelberg@templeisraelottawa.com.

Wednesday Talmud Class

Talmud class

For over 20 years, a committed core of students augmented by community members has been solving the mysteries of where our practices and values originate. We unpack the hidden histories and words of the ancient rabbis through the pages of the Talmud and modern explanations

Join us on Wednesdays at 1 pm. This adult education class is led by Rabbi Garten.

Books and Bagels

Books and Bagels invites you to attend the following reviews. Sessions are held on a Sunday morning on Zoom 10-11:30 a.m.

Everyone is welcome and no registration is required.
By zoom https://templeisraelottawa.zoom.us/j/99903947671
* The zoom link won’t work until the review date.

Nov. 27, 2022: “Our Country Friends” by Gary Shteyngart will be reviewed by Carlie MacPherson. This book explores the dynamics among a group of friends sheltering from the pandemic in an American weekend cottage.

Jan. 15, 2023: “Can We Talk About Israel?: A Guide for the Curious, Confused, and Conflicted” by Daniel Sokatch will be reviewed by Rabbi Steven Garten. Daniel Sokatch is the CEO of the New Israel Fund. This book is “an extremely nuanced view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict……broad in scope, detailed in analysis…thought provoking for the well-informed yet accessible for the new learner.”

Feb. 12, 2023: “Rebel Daughter” by Lori Banov Kaufmann will be reviewed by Jonathan Dunsky, an Israeli author. “Rebel Daughter” is a “tale of family, love and resilience … inspired by a major archaeological discovery in southern Italy: the 2,000 year old gravestone of Claudia Aster (Esther)”.

March 19, 2023: “People Love Dead Jews” by Dara Horn will be reviewed by Professor Deirdre Butler. According to Kirkus Reviews this is “a guided tour of the hypocrisy that serves as the mechanism by which antisemitism rages on unchecked”.

Look for details in weekly email updates, your usual source of Books and Bagels information or contact Lily Cox, lilycox@bell.net.

Where can I get the books?

Books are available through the Ottawa Public Library or the Greenberg Families Library at the Soloway JCC. The Malca Pass library and Temple Israel Library may also carry some of these titles.

Missed a Books and Bagels discussion?

We’ve archived past discussions.

Cooking with Temple

Temple’s chef Emma and her aspiring foodie sidekick Susan joined forces to present a virtual cooking and conversation hour on cooking for Sukkot.

Stuffed Eggplant (M’hasha)

Presented by Emma

  • 10 small eggplants, cored, the inside chopped
  • Oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • A bunch of parsley, chopped (stem and leaves separate)
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • ⅓ can of tomatoes
  • 1 ½ lbs ground beef
  • Pepper and salt to taste

Sauce:

  1. Mix ⅔ can of diced tomatoes, ½ can of water, lemon juice (about 3 lemons), about 4tbsp of brown sugar, salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil and set aside.
  2. Sauté onions, eggplant core, parsley stems in oil; season with salt and pepper.
  3. Add tomatoes, lemon juice, sugar, and adjust the seasoning (it should taste sweet and sour).
  4. Mix the ground beef with the parsley leaves, and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Add the eggplant/tomato mixture to the ground beef, mix first with a wooden spoon and when the mixture is cooler, mix with your hands until well incorporated.
  6. Stuff the eggplants with the mixture.
  7. Put the eggplants in a pot and pour the sauce around them until sauce reaches the edge of the eggplant. Cook on medium heat for about 20 minutes, then lower the heat and simmer until cooked and the tastes have developed. Adjust the seasoning, and serve with rice.
Eggplant recipe ingredients
Eggplant prep

Pumpkin with Everything Good

(Adapted from Dorie Greenspan)
Presented by Susan

  • 1 pumpkin, about 3 pounds (I like pie pumpkins/sugar pumpkins)
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 pound stale bread,  cut into 1/2-inch chunks (dried stuffing also works)
  • 1/4 pound cheese, such as Gruyère, cut into 1/2-inch chunks (any melting cheese like cheddar – or a mix of cheeses – will work!)
  • 2-4 garlic cloves, minced
  • About 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives (you could also use scallions)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 1/3 cup (or more) heavy cream (you can use a mix of cream and milk if you prefer a lighter dish)
  • Pinch of grated nutmeg

Center a rack in the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with a silicone mat or parchment, or find a casserole dish with a diameter that’s just a tiny bit larger than your pumpkin.  (If you bake the pumpkin in a casserole dish, it will keep its shape, but you’ll need to serve it from the casserole.  If you bake it on a baking sheet, you can present it freestanding, but maneuvering a stuffed pumpkin with a baked shell isn’t always easy.  I usually prefer to take the risk, as the presentation is pretty great!)

Using a sharp and sturdy knife, cut a “lid” out of the top of the pumpkin.  You want to cut off enough of a lid to make it easy to get inside the pumpkin.  Clear away the seeds and strings from the cap and from inside the pumpkin (this is a great job for kids). Season the inside of the pumpkin with salt and pepper, and put it on the baking sheet or in the pot.

Toss the bread, cheese, garlic, and herbs together in a bowl.  Season with pepper and stuff the mix into the pumpkin.  The pumpkin should be well filled.  Stir the cream with the nutmeg and some salt and pepper and pour it into the pumpkin.  You want enough cream that the ingredients are moistened but not so much that it looks like soup.  (Both the filling and the cream are a bit to taste and to the eye.  I always think more cheese is better!  You will likely need to adjust, depending on the size of the pumpkin).

Put the top in place and bake the pumpkin for about 2 hours (checking after 90 minutes) or until everything inside the pumpkin is bubbling and the flesh of the pumpkin is tender enough to be pierced with a knife (like testing a cake).  Remove the top during the last 20 minutes of cooking to bake away any liquid and so the stuffing can toast a bit.  When the pumpkin is ready, carefully bring it to the table.

This is also great with cooked rice (especially if you can’t have gluten – it is more of a risotto), peas, kale, or apples and chestnuts.

And, what to do with all of those pumpkin seeds?

  • 1 1/2 cups pumpkin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons salt, plus more for seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons spice blend of your choice

Heat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.  Fill a medium saucepan with two cups of water and season with 2 teaspoons salt.  Bring to a boil.  Meanwhile, clean the pumpkin seeds you have scooped from your pumpkin in a bowl filled with cold water.  Add the cleaned seeds to the boiling water and simmer for five minutes. Drain and pat the seeds very dry.  Place the seeds onto the prepared baking sheet.  Add the oil and any spices then toss until well coated. Spread the seeds into one layer. Bake, stirring  at least once, until golden, between 10-20 minutes, depending on the size of the seeds.

Pumpkin dish ingredients
Pumpkin dish spices
Pumpkin dish pre-cooked
Pumpkin dish cooked